Press "Enter" to skip to content

Consequences of the use and misuse of power

The train stops in a small desert town of Black Rock for after a long time in four years. Macreed, a war veteran arrives looking for a man named Komoko. Kamoko was a Japanese-American farmer whose name caused hostility among the residents of the town. Macreed intended to award a medal to kamoko that was posthumously dedicated to his son for bravery during the war in Italy. He is greeted in the town with silence and disdain. The town is hiding a shameful secret that they were too apathetic to deal with. He learned that Komoko is dead before long and that he had died under suspicious circumstances. As he digs deeper to what exactly happened, several attempts are made on his life. With the help of a local doctor and a remorseful hotelier, he must now endeavor to move out of Black Rock one way or another. Reno Smith suggests limitless power with how he controls the town without much effort until the arrival of Macreedy. Overall, “ Bad Day at Black Rock” revolves around the power of cowardice. However, at the end of the story, Macreedy actions have influenced the previously meek and beaten townspeople to rise above their shameful deference to Reno to make their own opinions.

<*** class="wp-block-image">

Invisible man

Dr. Bledsoe, once an idealistic young man who believed in the Founder’s dream. His experiences as a black man in a racist white society had distorted his vision of what his life. To survive, he learned to play the game at the expense of betraying his people and killing his vision. He became an egotist and power hungry opportunist so much that the narrator looked up to him until the moment he turns out to be a big phony. While he preached a doctrine of humility and hardwork as the key to black advancement, he retained his power as president of the college by pandering to white people’s expectations. Bledsoe’s supposed commitment to his race was a sham. In fact, at one point he declared that he would ensure that every black man in the country was lynched prior to giving up his position of authority. Bledsoe apparently feels the need to tell the narrator the truth to disillusion him about his perceived role in society. However, the narrator refused to listen to Bledsoe and instead threatened to expose him. In return, Bledsoe devised a devious plot to get rid of the narrator on realizing that he could not control him before he could cause trouble for the school.

Kingsblood royal power

During the world war, Kingsblood Royal viewed black soldiers as lazy and unintelligent because they were denied arms and used primarily as laborers The discovery shocks him and comes as a freezing shock because the character had been brought up to view black people as less than human.

(2) Dupre in chapter 25 of Invisible Man

After collecting the buckets of oil, the men escalate their destruction from random looting to the systematic destruction. According to the narrator, he is unsure where they are going. The narrator is however happy to simply follow the orders given to him. From that point, the narrator can see the true by-products of the riot. Instead of the black community liberating itself, it takes the time to destroy itself with debauchery. According to him, the actions were an example of how a community’s anger had failed to focus itself into something productive. He now sympathizes with their sense that none of them had anything to lose. Although he no longer believed in the Brotherhood, he could no longer escape his history in the community. As he wonders about the phone call, it becomes clear the strangeness of Brotherhood’s relationship to the riots. The role of Dupre is critical in the “Invisible Man.” His decision to burn down his own home can be viewed as one of the most radical moments of the entire novel. According to his reasoning, the tenement must be burned down to avoid another generation of black people being born into its squalid conditions. Dupre’s forces change after the action of burning the tenement down. The men endeavor to strike at the power or force that has put them in this position.

Garth Frierson in Pym

Pym has been laid out as “a road story” between Jaynes and his childhood friend, Garth. Garth Frierson was an unemployed bus driver and Jaynes childhood friend whose greatest pleasures were making pilgrimages and gorging on Little Debbie snacks . Angela Latham, Jaynes ex-girlfriend, is also invited. The supporting cast is far from robust in the personality department with the exception of Garth. With Garth, the novel veers into territory so daring that character development seems very much beside the point.

(3) Whiteness

Kingsblood Royal involves a satire of a self-satisfied town called Grand Republic. The name makes it a metaphor for the United States. Neil Kingsblood is the hero and victim in the story. Neil is a white World War II hero who believed that his family tree is covered with royal ancestors. To his distress, he finds that he is a direct descendant of a hundred percent ***** adventurer. He has been brought up believing that negros are lesser human beings. The discovery shocks him and comes as a freezing shock because the character had been brought up to view black people as less than human. During the world war, he viewed black soldiers as lazy and unintelligent because they were denied arms and used primarily as laborers.

The racist thinking that Neil embraced in his ”white” life became a threat to his existence after he turns black. Lewis exploits this fact by reflecting the status of the Negros in Grand Republic whom Neil had never before noticed. Neil ventures into the black part of town, where he is astonished to come across a broad array of black characters. He is surprised to know that some were more cultured and literate than him. Neil Kingsblood is precipitate and is incapable to control his tongue. Neil lets out the secret and recognizes a possible dizzying fall for his family and himself. In addition, ends up working in a sporting goods shop after he losing his job at the bank. One of the local matrons who had suddenly known him as black stare hungrily at his body, searching for signs of the animal sexuality they expected from Negroes. Eventually, the news concerning his blackness prompts a mob of crowd to the family’s door. The ability of Neil to claim a black identity reflects his privileged position as a white subject as well as his ethnically romanticized assumptions about being black.

Pym

The book Pym explored and dissected whiteness from the “whiteness” perspective. Every aspect of whiteness in this book is open to ridicule. White art, White cuisine ***********, White literature, White physicality, inter-racial *** and love, White marriage, and the White ancestral climate all come under ridicule in this book. It’s a bombardment, and it can’t even be said that the only people who hurt when Whiteness is attacked are the Whites.

Compared to Kingsblood royal, Pym can be considered as a “Turn-About Test” or a turnaround of normal and standard procedure which lets the reader see how far off-balance or over turned the system has been. The writer has done everything for Whiteness in this book that has been done to Blackness in countless other books. Compared to Kingsblood royal where blackness has been portrayed as the epitome of the monstrous, the weak, the uncivilized and the uncivilized, Pym offers the same to the white in the same context. Both are a reflection of how dynamics can be reversed in different contexts where both whiteness and blackness are made the subjects. The similarity in their approaches can be seen by how both works reflect color as their themes.

(4) Neil Kingsblood and Rodney Aldwick

Major Rodney Aldwick is Neil kingsblood’s boyhood friend. Rodney Aldwick turns against his friend when he discovers his black ancestry in Sinclair Lewis’s Kingsblood Roy. After the discovery, Neil is brought to his feet after all events by Aldwick’s white supremacist manifesto. Neil Kingsblood repudiates in front of the veteran millionaires of the Federal Club and Grand Republic and his own white-skin privilege by informing them concerning his African ancestry as well as his relationship with the African American political leaders maligned by Aldwick during his speech. Immediately, Neil is promptly expelled from the Federal Club. In addition, he summarily demoted when he proceeded to work at the bank after New Year’s.

After a short while, the news concerning Neil’s defection from the “white race” was all over the papers and on the local radio. At the point, return for Neil and his family-no negotiating with “whiteness”. Instead, their lives were then on the line every day. His daughter was racially denigrated at school, in a matter of weeks. In addition, he was forced to resign from the bank to search for another job. His dog was also shot and killed on his family’s front lawn. He also received death threats in the mail and on the phone

Tod Clifton and the invisible man

Tod Clifton was present at the brotherhood meeting just as the invisible man. Another relationship is that both characters had a confrontation with Ras during the riot. In fact, Tod Clifton had a cut on his face, and that had been inflicted by Ras where he was almost stabbed by a knife. Tod Clifton and the invisible man also had both confrontations with the police.

Chris Jayne and Garth

Chris and Jayne were the only people in the story that seemed even remotely interested in exploration. The other characters were interested in exploiting the situation somehow. Chris was the only person who predicted what they would find in the antarctic, and also played the role of hero and expert, despite the fact that he did not seem comfortable in the position.

(5) Stephen Albert in The Garden of Forking Paths

The name of Doc Albert gets him involved in this twisted spy plot. The coincidence comes to seem like a twist of fate. It becomes harder to believe the development as the narrative progresses. There are a hardly any clues that the passion for Ts’ui Pen’s work by Albert’s was more than purely academic. Albert was convinced that Ts’ui Pen was more than a mere novelist. He believed that he was a philosopher who possessed a great understanding of the universe enclosed an element of truth. It’s apparent that Albert practiced Ts’ui Pen’s philosophy. He was also completely convinced by the older scholar’s philosophy. According toYu Tsun observations, Albert had something that was unyielding, ancient, and even immortal or as he described, he had “something of the priest” about him. Albert’s spiritual dedication went a long way towards determining the magical realist qualities of the story. Albert is the guy who bridges the gap between an ambiguous theory and the world of the characters. In fact, under his instruction the universe began to look and behave a lot like the one imagined by Ts’ui Pen.

There are few chances that the man Yu Tsun looked up at random in the phone book would happen to be a scholar of Chinese culture. Moreover, his subject of study is the incomprehensible work of Yu Tsun’s great-grandfather. The writer brings the feeling that Yu Tsun is destined to meet Dr. Albert at least in this universe.Dr. Stephen Albert lifestyle’s sort of dissonantly resembled that of Ts’ui Pen himself. He embodies the figure of the scholar: erudite, patient and solitary. The writer stirs in us a sense of apprehension that Albert life was destined for the same fate just the same way his idol did by being assassinated by a stranger. Coincidentally, he does.

Chris Jayne

Chris Jaynes is the protagonist of Mat Johnson’s novel who an African-American professor of literature at a liberal Manhattan college who refused to minimize the scope of his teaching to reflect the African-American canon in addition to serving on the college diversity committee. His stand lead to the denial of position. Spurned a period not long ago by a love named Angela he collected thousands of books that included many rare books. His ancient book dealer arouses his obsession when he introduces him to The True and Interesting Narrative of Dirk Peters.

His fascination with Poe’s novel comes to a head when he comes across an unpublished 19th-century manuscript that suggested Poe’s novel that was partially set in the south was drawn closely from truth. Jayne embarks on an expedition to the Antarctica after assembling an all black mining crew in search of Poe’s fabled island of Tsalal. The undiscovered African diaspora homeland was said to be remote and mythic land of pure and utter blackness uncorrupted by whiteness. Jaynes imagines Tsala to be the last untouched fortress of the African Diaspora and the key to his personal salvation. For his expedition, with an all-black crew , some members were set to go to the South Pole for natural resources to exploit, others in search of adventure, and some for Jaynes at least, the mythical nature of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. However, he and his fellow adventurers found themselves enslaved by the giant white ice creatures and were unable to come into contact with the rest of the world and that also appear in Poe’s Narrative.

Mr kapasi

Mr. Kapasi is the protagonist of Jhumpa Lahiri’s title story. In both of Mr. Kapasi’s jobs as an interpreter for a doctor and as a tour guide, he acts as a cultural broker. He helps the patients from another region to communicate with their doctor in his work as an interpreter. As a tour guide, he shows mostly Americans and most English-speaking Europeans the sights of India. Mrs. Das helped him to view both as important vocations although neither occupation attains the aspirations of diplomacy he once had. Unfortunately, Mr. Kapasi is at the end unable to bridge the cultural gap between him and Mrs. Das. The differences stemmed from strictly national differences and more personal differences. In the end, his brief conversion from ordinary tour guide to a romantic interpreter ends poorly. He eventually returned to the ordinary drudgery of his days.

(8) Kingsblood

At the end of the novel, the hero accompanied by his family and some armed black friends, attempt to fire on an angry mob massing at the Kingsblood home. The event came after the community leaders failed to plead with them to move out of the prestigious white neighborhood. Promptly,the police move in to arrest Neil and others with the exception of Neil’s wife Vestal who was the daughter of a community leader as the story comes to an end.

Invisible Man

At the end of the story, the narrator learns that Ras was responsible for inciting the violent destruction. He also notes that all along, the Brotherhood had planned the race riots all along to deliberately cede power to Ras and allow Harlem to fall into mass chaos. He had become caught up in a rioter’s plans to burn down a tenement building only to realize that he had left his briefcase inside. He however risks the flames to salvage it. He prepares to put on his Rinehart costume which he had placed in his briefcase only to realize the sunglasses had broken. As he continued to run through the chaos, he came along a looted building where bodies appeared to be hanging as if they had been lynched from the ceiling. He realized that the bodies were mannequins. Later, he encountered Ras, dressed in the costume of an Abyssinian chieftain, spear-wielding and riding a black horse. He then calls for his followers to lynch the narrator regarding him as a traitor to the black people. He also required them to hang him among the mannequins. The narrator tries effortlessly to explain that the black community was turning against itself by burning and looting its own homes and stores and was only falling into the trap that the Brotherhood had set. To retaliate, Ras yelled back for the narrator’s death; however, the narrator managed to escape from the scene. On his way, he met two police officers in the who wanted to see the contents of his briefcase. He ran and fell through an open manhole into a coal cellar where the police trapped him underground by mocking him and putting the manhole cover back in place.

(11)

Dr. Stephen Albert is seen as a man of philosophy surrounded by a library book, fragment of a letter, a writing cabinet, and fragments of a letter: objects of a philosopher. The Chinese lantern he carries holds is a sign of the cross-cultural loyalty that have been developed through years of study. The phoenix figure present in his room could be regarded as a symbol of eternal rebirth a clue to the thematic nature of his work as well as his attitude towards reenactment of Ts’ui Pen’s life. Yu Tsun is associated with practical items: keys, a watch, some change, and a gun with a single bullet.

With Jaynes, the culture play can be seen in his quest to find the locations mentioned in The Narrative described as a mythical race of entirely black humans, free from the European colonialism. In addition, his confrontation with his college’s president presented him as mentally preparing by getting “gangsta” instead of “gangster” because “it expressed a willful unlawfulness even upon its own linguistic depiction

(6)

Invisible Man

The invisible man finds himself in the centre of a riot where he tries effortlessly to explain that the black community was turning against itself by burning and looting its own homes and stores and was only falling into the trap that the Brotherhood had set. To retaliate, Ras yelled back for the narrator’s death; however, the narrator managed to run away. On his way, he encountered two police officers in the who wanted to see the contents of his briefcase. He ran and fell through an open manhole into a coal cellar where the police trapped him underground by mocking him and putting the manhole cover back in place. Initially, the narrator was a member of the brotherhood group. This can be seen as an effort to try to adjust and fit it to his new surroundings. However, the events at the riot proved that his preconceived image of the surrounding was wrong after realizing that the Brotherhood had planned the race riots all along to cede power deliberately to Ras.

Neil Kingsblood

Neil Kings blood can be viewed to adjust to the surrounding by how he embraced in his ”white” life. However, the environment that he projected was a pre-conceived image of what those surroundings ought to be. It became a threat to his existence after he turns black. Lewis exploits this fact by reflecting the status of the black people in Grand Republic whom Neil had never before noticed. Neil ventures into the black part of town, where he is astonished to come across a broad array of black characters. He is surprised to know that some were more cultured and literate than him. Neil Kingsblood is precipitate and is incapable to control his tongue

Sherry Roberts is the author of this paper. A senior editor at MeldaResearch.Com in urgent custom research papers. If you need a similar paper you can place your order from nursing school papers services.

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: