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How do devices on a network communicate when they are only connected through a router? [duplicate]

        This is in my router's routing table:
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
192.168.1.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 br0
And this is my host's routing table:
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
0.0.0.0         192.168.1.1        0.0.0.0         UG    100    0        0 enp0s3
192.168.1.0        0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     100    0        0 enp0s3
and here is the br0 interface of the router:
br0       Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 24:4B:FE:F0:18:C0  
          inet addr:192.168.1.1  Bcast:192.168.1.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING ALLMULTI MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:68370 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:82681 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
          RX bytes:7411859 (7.0 MiB)  TX bytes:64534493 (61.5 MiB)
How would two hosts in the 192.168.1 subnet communicate with eachother? If they were both only connected to the router with ethernet? Here's how i think it works:
  1. host at 192.168.1.10 wants to send to 192.168.1.11
  2. The routing table entry 192.168.1.0 is chosen
  3. the host will broadcast an arp request for the mac address of 1.11
  4. The router receives this arp request on its br0 interface
  5. The bridge interface gets the mac address of 1.11 and sends it back to 1.10?
  6. The 1.10 host sends a frame with the mac address of 1.11 to the router's br0 interface?
  7. So does the bridge interface now realize that the mac address is not its own, and then forwards it to the correct host?

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